Artist's Statement:

Sometimes I am asked why my fashion illustration paintings have no faces. My reply, …"the entire thing is the face.”


#Fine Art Paintings

#L I S A  G I N D I  ​      #.       Fine Art Paintings  

Lisa Gindi  Circa 1991

Fine Art Canvas Giclee Prints framing Gliclee  Canvas Reproductions

#Biography

Biography

 

       Lisa Robin Gindi graduated from Fashion Institute of Technology and obtained her Masters of Science at Adelphi University, Soho Campus.  As the first-born child of two, Lisa grew up in Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn and in South Merrick.  She has lived in Deal, NJ, Delray Beach, Coral Springs, and, in Kew Garden Hills, Queens.  Lisa loves to mix pop-fashion and cars with outdoor scenery, as well as draw, then paint interiors with great detail.  Her art has emerged from painting on tie dyed shirts to painting on canvases. Her "Gindi-Glitz" paintings were featured on local-front page news, in a documentary film by Gregg Sullivan, on NY1 TV, and had New York gallery representation.  The art sales help raise funds for The Red Cross for Puerto Rico and other  weather devastated areas, for Bayside Live TV for Petfood Lifeline, and for Magen David for education.  She is an award-winning artist, as well.

     

     In 1985, Lisa was nominated the best artist at Edward R. Murrow High School, after decorating all the display cases with fashion designs and was awarded the Saint Gauden’s Bronze Medal at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  In college, Lisa became a member of DECA, did fund raising, some petite runway-modeling for school and for a furrier.  

 

     Lisa pursued her dream of designing womens' wear while studying in Manhattan. She would commute by train to FIT from the Sheepshead Bay station and think of her next creative design.  At 18 years of age she would borrow a car and go to Grand Street on the LES to purchase huge boxes of oversized mens' undershirts. She created a line of beach cover-ups using her sewing machine to sew elastic in them to make a hiked up,"skirt effect" and bought gallons of paint from Pearl Paint on Canal Street for the designs.  As there was no selection of beach cover-ups in stores back in the day and knowing her particular clientele, Lisa specially catered to each one of her "ladies on the beach" and designed-to-order, unique, swim-suit cover-ups to satisfy each and every one of them. She learned it was only cost effective to color the shirts, herself, with dye. A few times, young neighborhood children would ask, curiously, what she was doing with all the buckets outside the her home. They'd ask to come help with the tie dyes, squeezing out the colored water and removing the rubber bands, fascinated to see the bright, colored rings appear.

 

     Later, Lisa worked in a high school that was located in Park Slope, teaching fashion art, sports car illustration and african-mask art. She would sell shirts during the summer when  school was not in session. Her African art was displayed and raved about by Brooklyn And Staten Island Schools District Head, Michael Grandwitter, who praised, "we haven't seen anything like this in 30 years" !

 

​      In South Florida, Lisa taught Math at a charter school, sold t-shirts she made at the famous Thunderbird Flea Market, as well as at The Delray Beach Market, and did furniture, vignette display at Baer's in Boca Raton.

 

      In the early millennium, Lisa taught Regents Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry that she had to learn on her own for a teaching job in a Public High School. In her math classes, the  teens went through fashion magazines looking for their favorite brands, and devised wholesale and retail prices that they used in long, algebraic equations. They loved coming to math class because their favorite teacher was knowledgeable about their love of music, dance, and fashion trends, and of course,  she was so fair with them and cared so much.  One day, in 2008, a student looked up, admiringly, at this big, but lonely painting Lisa made, that was hanging next to the American flag ..........and, asked, "Ms. Gindi....you made that painting of the Twin Towers?  It's "mad-cool"......How come you never became an artist?" ..............
 

Fine Art Canvas Giclee Prints framing Gliclee Canvas Reproductions